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Module 1: Understanding Perinatal Grief


Important to note


Eliza Strauss has written this online training  for health professionals, as an educational aid to improve the bereavement care provided to families following pregnancy loss or after the death of a baby(ies).

The information contained within each module, reflects the best available evidence available at the time of its content preparation.

This information may change in the future when new research and/or recommendations become available and it is important as health professionals caring for bereaved families that you stay up to date with these changes as they occur.

The information contained within the modules are not intended as a substitute and care of a mother and her baby must be individualised and provided in light of the case-specific clinical assessment, diagnosis and treatment options available and appropriate to that mother.

The information provided intends to guide the health professional and does not override the health provider’s local institution’s policies and processes &/or guidelines.


Module 1


In this Module, we will begin with an overview of Perinatal loss and how this type of grief can be different to other types of loss.

Lesson 1 includes what parental grief looks like for families experiencing the death of their baby and then we will look at the different types of loss from miscarriage to stillbirth to neonatal loss in Lesson 2. In covering these, I will discuss the occurrence, the legal definitions and risk factors for each. In the final lesson (Lesson 3) of this first module, I will discuss the common reactions parents face in the early stages of their loss.

Included within each lesson is a range of resources for you that you will be able to download and use in your practice.

To get started with Module 1, simply click on the 'Complete and continue' button on the top right corner of your screen.

Back to: Protected: Perinatal Loss in Practice: What hospital staff need to know